Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.
China Post Contributors
  Arthur Cyr    Daniel J. Bauer    David Ting    
  Jean C. Wen    Joe Hung    
  John Metzler    Leif-Eric Easley    
  Peter Brookes    William Fang    
  William Vocke    Special to The China Post
After decades of priding itself on not having a single Chinese soldier on foreign soil (except for those serving in U.N. peacekeeping forces) and having no overseas military bases, China is somewhat awkwardly acknowledging that it is making a 180-degree turn by acquiring military facilities in far-off Djibouti, in northern Africa, near the Gulf of Aden.
Barack Obama, who has dubbed himself "America's first Pacific President," made his sixth trip to the region last week to attend meetings in Manila and Kuala Lumpur.
A single swallow, we are told, doesn't make a summer. That certainly applies to the trilateral meeting in Seoul on Nov. 1 at which Japanese Premier Shinzo Abe met his counterparts, President Park Geun-hye of South Korea and Premier Li Keqiang of China.
A strong, vigorous handshake that lasted more than a minute marked the historic first meeting between the leader of the People's Republic of China and the leader of Taiwan, which has been the home of the government of the Republic of China since its defeat by the Communists in the Chinese civil war in 1949.
China suffered a double whammy in the South China Sea last week as the United States Navy carried out a freedom-of-navigation operation, sending a destroyer to within 12 nautical miles of artificial islands in the Spratly Island group,
It must have been a bittersweet moment for Xi Jinping, the head of the world's biggest Communist Party, to be riding in a gilded carriage seated next to Queen Elizabeth II on their way to Buckingham Palace.
The Kuomintang (KMT), Taiwan's ruling party, fearful of a disastrous outcome in the presidential and legislative elections in January, finally took the plunge and replaced its original presidential candidate, Hung Hsiu-chu, with party Chairman Eric Chu, mayor of New Taipei City.
The agreement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, reached after five years of often nail-biting sessions that ended inconclusively, marks a triumph for the United States, especially for President Barack Obama, but opposition to it is so strong in the U.S. Congress that its passage is far from certain next year, which will be marked by U.S. presidential election campaign rhetoric.
Immediately after his state visit to the United States, China's leader Xi Jinping headed for New York, as did his host, Barack Obama.
China's leader Xi Jinping averted a confrontation during his visit to the United States by agreeing with Barack Obama that each country would refrain from conducting or supporting cyber attacks to steal intellectual property for commercial gain.
1 Comment
< Prev
Sitemap | Top Stories | Taiwan | China | Business | Asia | World | Sports | Life | Arts & Leisure | Health | Editorial | Commentary | Travel | Movies | TV Listings
Classifieds | Bookstore | Getting Around | Weather | Guide Post | Student Post | Subscribe | Advertise | About Us | Career | Contact Us
Copyright © 1999 – 2015 The China Post. Breaking news from Taiwan, China and the world.
The China Post  Terms of use