Japan's new liquor tax laws aren't so bitter for 'real beer' drinkers

Japan's new liquor tax laws aren't so bitter for 'real beer' drinkers

It's time for Japan to start getting into real beer.
Why Canada is better than the US — and why it's not

Why Canada is better than the US — and why it's not

The many similarities between the US and Canada are obvious, but data show that on health care and crime, the Canadians have a distinct edge.
Sooner or later, Washington is going to have to bite the bullet on North Korea

Sooner or later, Washington is going to have to bite the bullet on North Korea

What can and will come of the U.S.-China dialogue on the rogue state's nuclear program?
What to do about the rising tide of refugees?

What to do about the rising tide of refugees?

Over 65 million people worldwide are victims of a score of conflicts, and humanitarian assistance and preventive diplomacy are needed now to solve these calamities.
North Korea and Syria: two evil states

North Korea and Syria: two evil states

Comparing these two powder kegs offers some ideas into how to deal with them.
France votes for moderation — again

France votes for moderation — again

Historically, France suffered after WWII from chronically unstable governments. The rise of Marine Le Pen has raised the specter of that past.
China's focus on Taiwan's weakness may backfire

China's focus on Taiwan's weakness may backfire

Not only is China reducing the number of countries that recognize Taiwan, it's also insisting that nongovernmental relations with Taiwan be tightened.
Could know-how trump aid to Africa?

Could know-how trump aid to Africa?

The U.S. is now talking about giving technology to the developing world instead of money, but Taipei has been doing that for decades.
R.I.P. the architect of German unity

R.I.P. the architect of German unity

Through perseverance and fate, this man from a small West German city became a statesman on the world stage.

Wang Dan's Taiwan independence fancy world

Wang Dan, the most visible student leader in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, is leaving for the United States next month after teaching Chinese history at two of Taiwan's most prestigious national universities for eight years. Before saying goodbye, he warned on the eve of the 27th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre that Taiwan shouldn't talk about independence unless the people are ready to die for the cause.

Can the world hold Duterte to account?

Against the illegal drugs trade in his country, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has let slip the dogs of war -- and the havoc includes thousands of dead Filipinos, most of them poor. As he prepares to mark a year in office at the end of this month, those who are anguished about the killings ask: Can the community of nations play a role in holding Duterte to account?

Britain's earthquake election

The unexpected results of the British general election continue to reverberate. The Conservative Party led by Prime Minister Theresa was generally expected to increase their thin majority in the House of Commons, which forms the government, and thereby move ahead more confidently in implementing their ambitious program.

Hong Kong: Whither 'one country, two systems'?

Nearly 20 years ago, on July 1, 1997, Britain turned Hong Kong over to China under the Sino-British Joint Declaration, which provided that the territory would be largely autonomous under the "one country, two systems" formula devised by then-paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.

DPP infighting or an early election campaign?

Last Monday, Mayor William Lai of Tainan said before his city council that he was friendly with China and loved Taiwan as well. His pro-China remark set tongues wagging, especially in the context of President Tsai Ing-wen's government policy regarding the PRC.

President Tsai's 'New Southward Policy' is struggling without Beijing

President Tsai Ing-wen isn't talking about her great "New Southward Policy" anymore.
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